Sunday, June 12, 2011

hype of the week: 1995 cavaliers

This week's pre-race hype is All About The Drill. Watch the insane drill-writing where the hornline forms four squares that pinwheel and mesh into one, while the color guard manhandles the biggest flags in drum corps (when you have an all-male corps, your guard can do some heavy lifting indeed). Plus, you can't go wrong with Holst. An amazing show that took the Cavvies all the way to the top at DCI Finals in '95. This one's for all the band geeks. Enjoy, and if you're local I'll see you at PIR tomorrow night.

2 comments:

Mr. Fusion Jazz said...

Insane! I still can't figure out how they do that. And I love the gyroscopic "circle/ring" thing at the end. Who thinks of these routines and stuff that goes with it? And then to be able to execute it. Wow! As always, I enjoy the hypes. Thanks for posting this and for the drum routine earlier.

Cheers, Gene in Tacoma

bikelovejones said...

Drum corps became a LOT more muscular in the 1990's when the drill-writing became insane.
Back in the 1970's, drum line drill writing consisted of "elevator" movement -- up and down on the 50-yard line while the rest of the corps did the fancy stuff all around them. In the late 1980's, drum lines began moving all over the field. The first drum lines that "crab-walked" sideways across the field with their drums strpped on left many in the stands slack-jawed in amazement; today "crab-walking" is standard fare for a marching drummer.

Marching these new, radical drills required a huge leap in fitness. Corps members now do calisthenics that rival the speed and intensity workouts I did in high school track: crunches, running the stadium stairs, and yoga -- every morning from winter camps all the way through summer tour. The result is that today's corps members are in much better shape than we were at their age.

A guy I used to coach corps with wrote drills by swirling a cooked spaghetti noodle in a dish of olive oil, then transferring his ideas to chart paper. Rumor has it that lots of drill designers did their conceptualizing while under the influence of hallucinogens.